Monthly Archives: August 2018

Food for Thought: challenges and opportunities for farming in the Melbourne Foodbowl

Come along and join BEAM members and friends at our AGM on September 22, 6.30pm.

Our guest speaker is Jen Sheridan from University of Melbourne

Jen is a sustainable food system researcher  and will be discussing her research (from the Foodprint Melbourne Project) on the environmental impact of feeding Melbourne now and at 2050.

She will demonstrate how an area like Mitchell Shire can support a thriving, vibrant local food economy sees farmland as far more than just ‘suburbs in waiting’.

Cities are often founded where fertile soils and plentiful water provides the farming conditions needed to feed the population and Melbourne is no exception.  But as Melbourne grows to a city of 8 million people, how can we plan our urban areas in ways that don’t destroy the farms that feed us?  Can we design our city in ways that make best use of our city – fringe farmland and provide a more resilient city food bowl?

The AGM will be held at Blue Tongue Berries – 455 Northwood Road Seymour.

For more information and booking details – please select here

Directions to Blue Tongue Berries (BTB) – Travel along the Hume Freeway (M31) until you reach the Seymour-Tooborac (C384) exit. Head towards Seymour, and then turn at Northwood Road (aka Manse Hill Rd) which is the first road on the left. Travel for 4.45 km to 445 Northwood Road. BTB is the last gate on the left just before the freeway overpass.  Look out for the red arrow and Blue Tongue Berries sign at the gate.

 

 

 

 

 

Wattle Day and the Changing Seasons

Golden Wattle

Wattle Day will be celebrated at the Australian Light Horse Memorial Park on Sunday 2nd September 2018, from 10:00am to 1:30pm (see details here).

Wattles are have been a symbol of the Australian bush for a long time and their flowering heralds the changes in the seasons in south-eastern Australia.

Lesley Dalziel writes that “the sight of the first wattles in Spring must have brought joy to all, both the aboriginal inhabitants and the early settlers.  The bright blooms heralded the beginning of a season of growth and for the settlers, a new harvest.  For the aborigines the wattles would be a sign of welcome warmth to come, and a harvest of wattle seeds for baking.  All would have appreciated the beauty of the transformed landscape.”

Wattles were first used as a meaningful emblem in Tasmania in 1838.  Later in the century, the Australian Natives Association argued for the wattles as a national floral emblem, similar to the thistle for Scotland.  In 1899, Field naturalist AJ Campbell founded the Victorian Wattle Club (later League). He helped organise spring excursions on the 1st September each year into the bush surrounding Melbourne.  All this evolved into the first ‘national’ Wattle Day, celebrated in Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide on 1 September 1910. Continue reading

Broadford Bushland Reserves in Good Hands

The bushland reserves in Broadford are small but vibrant reserves for native plants and animals and for people who appreciate a quiet walk in the bush.

Broadford Land Management Group (BLMG) has been working with Council staff to manage some of these reserves for many years, and there are plans for more activities over the next few years.

The group began as a committee of management for the new Colin Officer Flora Reserve on Horwood Road in 2007.  This reserve has matured with the plantings, weed control, track maintenance and signage carried out by BLMG.  It is a real asset for Broadford and credit to the work of the group and the Council.

Last year, the group completed a project to create a parkland and bushland corridor along Whiteman’s Reserve off the Clonbinane Road.  This project began as one of the first activities of the newly formed Broadford Environmental Action Movement (later BEAM Mitchell Environment Group) in 1990.

BLMG volunteers at Whitemans Reserve: Peta Langbehn, Barb Moss, Tom Fenton, Louise Falls, Judy Fenton and Bob Tomkins

Bob Tomkins, a long-term member of the group, says that this corridor was part of a larger vision for wildlife corridors and walking trails proposed by Dr Colin Officer and other members of BEAM in 1995.  Many working bees later, and with great support from Mitchell Shire Council’s Environmental Programs staff, Whiteman’s Reserve is now a very attractive route for walkers in Broadford and a safe corridor for wildlife (see article).

Broadford has several other bushland areas so there is still plenty of work for people interested in enhancing and caring for the natural places of Broadford.

Broadford Land Management Group is holding its Annual General Meeting on Wednesday 22nd August.  Anyone interested in joining the group as an occasional worker or a more committed committee member is welcome to come along.

Later in Spring, the group will hold its annual wildflower walk in the Colin Officer Flora Reserve. This is an opportunity to see and learn about nature in Broadford in full flower.

For more information about the group and the AGM, contact the Secretary on 0468 795 954 or broadfordlmg@gmail.com.